Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘sylvia hewitt’

First, because we play fair in this space, a response to Barbara Ehrenreich’s commentary on the happiness gap — if you aren’t sick to death of it (FYI: we are) — from Justin Wolfers, one of the authors of the original study, in the New York Times. Read it here.

Second, a piece from Bloomberg by Sylvia Hewitt (You remember her from the piece Shannon posted a couple of days ago, yeah? If not, catch it here.) that again extols the virtues of flextime, points out that, though women will soon outnumber men in workforce, they are often the family’s sole breadwinner, shouldering “a disproportionate load of family responsibility and earn 20 percent less than men” All of which puts an “extra pressure on an already strained work-life balance.” Her solution, which benefits everything from families to the bottom line (and — hello, duh — the new majority of the workplace): more flextime.

Moreover, it’s been proven that flexibility is a powerful lure in recruiting and motivating top talent. Employees are able to concentrate without being interrupted by phone calls, meetings, and other workplace distractions. Eliminating watercooler gossip sessions — a significant time sink in a high-anxiety environment — is a huge boost to productivity. And knowing that an employer trusts and respects its people enough to help them do what it takes to perform better — through remote work options, staggered schedules, and reduced-hour arrangements — pays back in greater appreciation and loyalty.

Finally, last but hardly least, yesterday’s post ended with the question:

Sure, we’ve got the options we wanted, but why do we still have trouble navigating them? Which leads to my question: Why did our work stall, and how do we get rolling again?

The best answer, along the lines of “we need to get over ourselves” came from Colleen:

I think it all goes back to what my parents used to tell me when I complained as a child… Life isn’t fair. Or easy. Be careful what you wish for. Don’t wish your life away. The list goes on.

Sadly or maybe not, I think it is a part of human nature to always want more and to not be content with what you have. It’s what got us these F*%&ing choices in the first place, what makes us work through the imperfection of the choices now and what will make the choices even better in the future.

But, sometimes you just need a little time to vent… complaining feels good, it does! So, we feminists need to do what I did as a kid, lay down on the kitchen table, kick and scream and pound your fists for a minute or two, and then get to work.

Dig it. And have a good weekend.

Read Full Post »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 229 other followers